Formal and informal language for IELTS

Contractions in the IELTS exam

In the IELTS Academic writing module, avoid using contractions. Contractions set a more informal tone to a piece of writing. It is fine to use contractions in the speaking module – in fact, not using contractions when speaking will make your English sound halting and a little forced.

The number of job applications hasn’t increased over the last ten years.

The number of job applications has not increased over the last ten years.
Continue reading “Formal and informal language for IELTS”

Idioms for IELTS

A piece of cake

This refers to a task task that can be accomplished very easily.

Anybody who thinks that the IELTS exam is a piece of cake is fooling themselves.

Remember that you won’t do yourself any favours if you simply throw these idioms into conversation during your IELTS interview. You must practice using them appropriately before the exam.

Idioms for IELTS

Pass the buck

This is when we try to avoid responsibilty by passing it on to someone else. Sometimes, we hope that someone else will take the blame for failure or for a poor decision.

He accepted responsibilty for the failure of the project and refused to pass the buck even though his manager had made the decisions that had led to the failure.

Remember that you won’t do yourself any favours if you simply throw these idioms into conversation during your IELTS interview. You must practice using them appropriately before the exam.

Idioms for IELTS

Pull the plug

This is when we put a stop something or bring something to an end. It is often used when a business project or strategy is losing or going to lose money.

The company pulled the plug on the development of the new product when they discovered that market research showed that it would not sell.

Remember that you won’t do yourself any favours if you simply throw these idioms into conversation during your IELTS interview. You must practice using them appropriately before the exam.

Idioms for IELTS

Zero tolerance

This is when no crime, no matter how big or small, will be ignored or overlooked. It is often used when talking about racism, sexism or drug-taking.

Our school has a zero tolerance policy on drug-taking. If you are caught, you are expelled.

Remember that you won’t do yourself any favours if you simply throw these idioms into conversation during your IELTS interview. You must practice using them appropriately before the exam.

Idioms for IELTS

The ball is in your court

We use this to indicate that someone else has to make a decision.

I have given you all the details of my car. You have all of the information that you need now. The ball is in your court if you want to make me an offer and buy it.

Remember that you won’t do yourself any favours if you simply throw these idioms into conversation during your IELTS interview. You must practice using them appropriately before the exam.

Idiom for IELTS

Rule of thumb

This is a rule that is not meant to be strictly accurate or reliable in every case.

As a rule of thumb, I go out every Saturday night. I didn’t go out last Saturday night and I can’t go out next Saturday night.

Remember that you won’t do yourself any favours if you simply throw these idioms into conversation during your IELTS interview. You must practice using them appropriately before the exam.

Idiom for IELTS

Out of the blue

This is something that happens suddenly and unexpectedly.

His resignation came out of the blue. We really weren’t expecting it.

Remember that you won’t do yourself any favours if you simply throw these idioms into conversation during your IELTS interview. You must practice using them appropriately before the exam.

Idiom for IELTS

Gut feeling

This is an intuitive feeling you get. It is usual when you are asked to make decisions but have no reasons for your decision. We often make these decisions in times of stress or under pressure.

I wasn’t sure which job to take but I went with my gut feeling and chose the job in London.

Remember that you won’t do yourself any favours if you simply throw these idioms into conversation during your IELTS interview. You must practice using them appropriately before the exam.