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Idioms for IELTS

Zero tolerance

This is when no crime, no matter how big or small, will be ignored or overlooked. It is often used when talking about racism, sexism or drug-taking.

Our school has a zero tolerance policy on drug-taking. If you are caught, you are expelled.

Remember that you won’t do yourself any favours if you simply throw these idioms into conversation during your IELTS interview. You must practice using them appropriately before the exam.

Idiom for IELTS

A Piece of Cake
A task or job that is accomplished very easily.

I found the writing paper hard in the IELTS practice exam but the reading paper seemed like a piece of cake.

Try to use this idiomatic expression in conversation over the next few days.

Three little wishes

Using wish in your IELTS exam

Ricardo came to me after his IELTS exam and explained that he suddenly understood the value of actually using new language before the exam. He told me that he had sometimes been “bored” during my classes when I made the students focus on a point of grammar and use it, even though he felt he already really understood it. Actually being in the IELTS interview brought home to him the value of practice and that the time to experiment is not during the actual exam. Basically, Ricardo had tried to use wish and realised that he wasn’t sure which form to use to say what he wanted to say. We had covered wish quite extensively in class and Ricardo admitted that he had “switched off” a little during practice.

“I really thought that I understood the grammar and would be able to use it when I needed it. I know now that I should have practised more so that I was used to actually using the language.”

Ricardo is a good student but he sometimes is guilty of wanting to move on too quickly. He now understands the need to practice and use all new language. I am sure his mistake (if he really did make one) won’t affect his final IELTS grade too much.

Here’s a refresher in wish for Ricardo. Other IELTS candidates might find it useful too.

wish + past simple (or continuous)

I wish I were taller.
Sam wishes he lived closer to his mother.

This wish expresses an unrealistic desire for the present to be different. Something might change in the future but we want now to be different. We accept that we can’t change what is true right now. Just becaus e the past is in this construction doesn’t mean it is about the past. This is an example of an unreal past tense in English. Notice that I is followed by were in the example. This might seem strange but it is correct. It is also possible to use was instead. The same rule applies to he, she and it.

I wish I were better at arithmetic.
I wish I was better at arithmetic.
He wishes he were a faster runner.
He wishes he was a faster runner.

wish + past perfect simple

I wish I had studied harder at university.
Jayne wishes she hadn’t eaten so many cakes. She feels sick now.

This wish expresses an impossible desire for the past to be different. We accept that we can’t change the past. We just look back at past actions, often with regret, and wish they were different. We can’t travel back in time to change past actions (unless we are Marty McFly in Back to the Future.)

wish + would

I wish you would stop taking my pens.
He wishes it would stop raining.

In this wish, we want there to be a change, either now or in the future. We hope that the change might happen and it is a possibility. The change depends on an outside force and not on the actions of the person making the wish. We never use this form with I because you can make changes yourself.

We don’t say :

I wish I would study harder.

You can make the decision to study harder if you want to.

In many cases, wish used this way expresses irritation on the part of the speaker.

I wish he would stop talking. He’s giving me a headache.

In Ricardo’s case, he was talking about his education and education in his country. He felt that he hadn’t been pushed enough in his English studies. What he should have said (and I hope he did say!!) is:

I wish they had made me work harder in English at school.

Go back to all of the example sentences above and make sure that you can see why they are appropriate for each situation (you might need to read the grammar explanation again.)

It seems as though it has been raining here in England for months. Actually, it has been raining for months. It’s supposed to be summer!! Grrrrrr! I could say any of the following sentences in relation to the rain. Can you see why they all mean something different but they are all correct?

I wish it wasn’t raining.

I wish it hadn’t started raining.

I wish it would stop raining.

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Dictation listening exercise for IELTS : the transcript

It was great to get such positive feedback for this simple dictation exercise. The students that emailed me what they wrote did really well and they managed to identify language that they could use in their own writing.

Here’s a transcript of the free IELTS listening dictation: (more…)

The IELTS exam is quite difficult

Be careful when you are using the adverb quite. You can change the meaning of a sentence by putting the main stress on this adverb.

Imagine someone has just cooked dinner for you and they ask you what you think of the food. This is your reply:

It’s quite nice.

(more…)