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IELTS test

Idioms for IELTS

Pull the plug

This is when we put a stop something or bring something to an end. It is often used when a business project or strategy is losing or going to lose money.

The company pulled the plug on the development of the new product when they discovered that market research showed that it would not sell.

Remember that you won’t do yourself any favours if you simply throw these idioms into conversation during your IELTS interview. You must practice using them appropriately before the exam.

Idiom for IELTS

Rule of thumb

This is a rule that is not meant to be strictly accurate or reliable in every case.

As a rule of thumb, I go out every Saturday night. I didn’t go out last Saturday night and I can’t go out next Saturday night.

Remember that you won’t do yourself any favours if you simply throw these idioms into conversation during your IELTS interview. You must practice using them appropriately before the exam.

Idiom for IELTS

Drive someone up the wall

This is when we irritate someone or really annoy them.

His constant coughing drives me up the wall.

Remember that you won’t do yourself any favours if you simply throw these idioms into conversation during your IELTS interview. You must practice using them appropriately before the exam.

Idiom for IELTS

A blessing in disguise

This is something good that isn’t recognized as good at first.

Losing my job was a blessing in disguise because I have now found a much better job.

IELTS vocabulary: affect vs effect

Many students confuse affect and effect. Do you know the difference? Which on is a verb and which one is a noun?

Affect is a regular verb. It usually means to influence or change something.

The cold weather really affects my concentration.

His injury affected the result of the football match.

Effect is a noun. It is a result of something.

One effect of the cold is that I lose concentration.

His injury had no effect on the result of the football match.

Be careful because effect can also be used as a regular verb! It is not commonly used in this way but it can be. It means to produce a result or to make something happen.

The dramatic tax cuts were designed to effect spending change in the economy.

Effective is an adjective which tells us that something is good for its purpose.

Her teaching methods were very effective and we all got a grade 7 in the IELTS exam.